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Iconic ‘Eye’ Windows Sold at Estate Sale of Wisconsin’s Amityville Horror House

Amityville Horror props were sold at an estate sale this weekend at the Wisconsin lakehouse that served as the iconic haunted house in the 2005 film.
Amityville Horror house in Wisconsin

An estate sale was held over the weekend, on May 5, 6, and 7, at the Victorian lakehouse in Salem, Wisconsin where the 2005 Amityville Horror remake was filmed. The sale drew crowds who either just wanted to get a closer look at the historic home, or were just interested in it for its film history. According to the Kenosha News, the film production spent $60,000 to fit the house with a fake facade resembling the notorious house on Ocean Ave in Amityville, New York where 23-year-old Ronald J. DeFeo Jr. murdered his entire family in 1974.

Amongst the various items for sale over the weekend was a bed used by actor Ryan Reynolds to shoot a scene, available for $70, and the iconic “eye” windows from the facade, which sold for $300 each.

The house, known as Oakwood Manor, is also for sale. The massive 3,548-square-foot Queen Anne built circa 1880 includes six bedrooms, two bathrooms, original wood staircase, an enclosed wrap-around porch, a one-lane bowling alley in a separate building on the property, 500 feet of lakefront property on Silver Lake, and a boathouse and gazebo overlooking the lake.

The Amityville Horror house in Wisconsin

Wisconsin Amityville Horror house

Wisconsin Amityville Horror house entrance

Landing and stained glass window

Amityville Horror house dining room

Wisconsin Amityville Horror house gazebo and boat house

Wisconsin Amityville Horror house bowling alley

But does it come with any ghosts? Probably not, since it’s a long way from the real Amityville Horror. Also, the real estate listing does not include a Native American burial ground.

A house this old, though, is sure to have some stories of its own.

Wisconsin house used in Amityville Horror 2005
The house as seen in The Amityville Horror (2005)

The Real Amityville Horror

The real Amityville Horror is the strange story of the brutal DeFeo murders that took place 13 months earlier.

This A&E documentary explores the true story behind the Amityville Horror: the bizarre circumstances surrounding the brutal murders of the DeFeo family on November 13th, 1974.

The real Amityville horror: Mugshot of Ronald DeFeo, Jr.Thirteen months before George and Kathleen Lutz moved into the foreboding Dutch Colonial house located at 112 Ocean Ave in Amityville, New York, Ronald DeFeo, Jr. marched through the house with a rifle. At about 3 o’clock in the morning the eldest DeFeo brother, 23 at the time, went room to room, putting a .35 caliber bullet through each of his family members: his mother, father and all four of his younger siblings.

At the crime scene police found each victim lying face down in their beds with no signs of struggle or the use of sedatives. A suppressor was not used on the rifle, but the neighbors never heard the gunshots. It was determined that most of the victims were asleep at the time of the murders.

William Weber, DeFeo’s lawyer, mounted a defense to support a plea of insanity. DeFeo claimed he murdered his family in self-defense because he heard their voices plotting against him.

In an interview with author Ric Osuna for his 2002 book The Night the DeFeos Died, Ronald DeFeo implicated his sister Dawn, as well as two friends. Forensic evidence of unburned gun powder on Dawn’s nightgown could potentially support this claim, but the truth may never be known.

The Lutzes moved into the house in December of 1975. They were eager to start their new lives together, and the tragedy gave the house a price tag they couldn’t refuse.

28 days later, the Amityville Horror was born.

The real Amityville Horror house, crime scene of the DeFeo murders

Attorney Weber initially tried to ink a book deal with the Lutzes, presumably to support his defense in DeFeo’s trial, which had just begun in October of 1975. A disagreement over percentages, however, lead to the Lutzes working with Jay Anson, instead. The book told the story of what has become the most controversial haunted house story of all time.

Inside Amityville: The Story Behind My Amityville Horror

Tony Brueski of Real Ghost Stories Online talks with filmmaker Eric Walter about the making of his documentary My Amityville Horror. The film explores the controversial story of The Amityville Horror from the perspective of Daniel Lutz, the oldest of the three Lutz.

In this interview, Walter discusses how he came into contact with Lutz, and how the 8 hour interview came to change his perception of the Amityville events.

My Amityville Horror

What is it like to live with the stigma of being involved in arguably the most controversial real-life haunted house story ever told? In the new documentary My Amityville Horror, Daniel Lutz tells his story for the very first time.

Daniel Lutz stands in front of the real-life Amityville horror house at 112 Ocean Ave in Amityville, NY

There has been much speculation about the events that took place in the 28 days between December 1975 and January 1976 while the Lutz family occupied the house at 112 Ocean Ave in Amityville, NY. Over the years dozens of books and movies have weaved supernatural tales of a demonic pig creature with glowing red eyes, swarms of flies, levitation and much more, all seemingly correlating to the brutal DeFeo murders in the house 13 months earlier.

Daniel Lutz has lived in the shadow of The Amityville Horror his whole lifeNewlyweds George and Kathy Lutz moved into the now infamous Amityville house to a start a new life. Daniel, who was just nine years old at the time, was the oldest of Kathy’s three children from a previous marriage. Now, close to 40 years after his family fled the house in terror, the stonemason living in Queens is the subject of the documentary My Amityville Horror as the “lost witness to a world famous haunting.”

Throughout the interview with director Eric Walter, Daniel claims he always just wanted a chance to tell his story, while alternately seeming to feign anger toward Walter for making him dredge up old traumas. As he begins to tell his story, he seems to be doing nothing more than recounting scenes from the movie alongside deep-seated emotional issues with his domineering step-father. His recollection of events tend to seem contrived, disassociated. Besides a rather unbelievable claim of having witnessed George practicing telekinesis in the garage one day, he brings no new details or insight to the table.

Walter seems to have been skeptical of at least some of Daniel’s claims, but seeking the truth wasn’t exactly the purpose of the film. Walter has had a fascination with the Amityville story for a long time. At 18 he launched the website AmityvilleFiles.com, now the largest archive of Amityville-related research on the web. It is through that website that Daniel Lutz reached out to him. Walter says the film is a character study, examining how the story has effected those who live in its shadow.

Ed and Lorraine WarrenThe film features many prominent voices in Amityville history, but the most interesting part of the film is when Danny and the crew visit the home of Ed and Lorraine Warren. The Warrens have spent a lifetime researching and investigating supposedly paranormal cases. They have authored many books on their investigations, and started an occult museum in their house to display the haunted objects they have accumulated over the years. They were among the very first to investigate the Lutz’s claims, corroborating the evil presence in the house with their expertise in demonology and clairvoyance.

Ed passed away in 2006, but Lorraine continues their life work. Because Ed communicated to her from the afterlife that she should.

When the documentary crew comes to her house, Lorraine discusses her conversation with the Lutz kids during a stroll on the beach sometime shortly after the incident. Then the tone turns more serious. Lorraine wants to show two very powerful religious relics, but is nervous to unveil them if there are any non-believers present. She asks the crew if everyone believes in God. Daniel threatens that he will “call them out on it later” if anyone isn’t being truthful.

Though there are a couple of “agnostics” in the room, Lorraine decides it will be okay. She reveals a small crucifix she claims to be made out of or infused with wood from the actual cross Christ was crucified on. The other object is a religious icon containing a hair of the Catholic saint Padre Pio, which supposedly protected her during the March 6th, 1976 investigation of the Amityville house.

This is Daniel’s first time speaking publicly about his experiences in the Amityville house. The other Lutz children, Christopher and Melissa, declined to participate in the film. Melissa, who was very young at the time, has always preferred her privacy. In 2011, however, Christopher decided to speak up. He claimed that most of the details in the original book and movie were made up, offering a different perspective where George’s tampering with the occult was to blame for the haunting.

Listen to his interview with Spooky Southcoast here.

Whether Amityville was a horror or a hoax, Eric Walter’s film has successfully added a new facet to events that have been scrutinized for decades. It reveals a previously unexplored page of the story with testimony that seems to unintentionally speak more truth than any other before it.

My Amityville Horror will be an important piece of the canon for many years to come.